Mirrors

Credit: Susan J. Stickle A skilled rider with refined body awareness helps the horse learn to work in a symmetrical balance, which results in less wear and tear on the horse’s body. Lauren Sammis rides Whitman, a 12-year-old KWPN gelding.

Developing Balance and Symmetry in the Dressage Horse and Rider

Lauren Sammis explains how constant awareness of your position in relation to your horse’s body is the key to proper riding.

arnd bronkhorst hack dressage horses

How to Assess Progress in Your Dressage Training

Jan Brons explains steps you can take to avoid frustration for you and your horse as you move forward in your training.

Credit: Silke Rottermann It is a requirement of dressage that the horse go with his poll at the highest point and his nose slightly in front of the vertical. A person on the ground can help you tell if this requirement is met. If someone is not available, mirrors are a good substitute.

How to Determine If Your Horse Is Behind the Vertical (Without Mirrors!)

USDF “S” judge Marilyn Heath offers advice on how to tell if your dressage horse is going with his poll at the highest point and his nose slightly in front of the vertical.