Self-carriage

Credit: Annie Morris The aids of a sophisticated half halt are a minute calf lift/fluff to increase the energy, a pause in hip movement while slightly increasing the weight of your seat bones, closing either one (usually the outside) or both hands into fists on the reins during a moment of increased tone in your forearms, triceps, latissimus dorsi and trapezius—lats and traps.

How Do I Ride a Half Halt?

USDF certified instructor Jennifer Truett offers her advice

secrets of the half halt

The Secrets of the Half Halt with Conrad Schumacher

Trainer Conrad Schumacher explains step by step how to master the intricacies of the half halt and ride it correctly—whatever the situation.

24 Dressage Training Tips

24 Dressage Training Tips from Kyra Kyrklund

Five-time Olympian Kyra Kyrklund shares her dressage training secrets at a Kentucky symposium.

cristina kayvon pierce baltimore first level

Shift Balance to Encourage Self-Carriage in Dressage

Biomechanics expert Susanne von Dietze critiques Cristina Kayvon-Pierce at First Level.

Credit: Photos courtesy, Cindy Sydnor Emme Johnston rides Just Jake, her 14-year-old Canadian/Thoroughbred cross gelding, at Third Level.

Courtney King-Dye's Advice to Improve Your Balance in the Saddle

Courtney King-Dye critiques Emme Johnston at Third Level.

Credit: SusanJStickle.com Rachel Chowanec (shown) and Courtney King-Dye are two long-time students of Lendon Gray who exemplify following the horse’s movement extremely well.

The Rider's Role in Self-Carriage

Lendon Gray explains how the use of passive aids can improve a horse's self-carriage.