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Day 26: Provide Your Horse with Plenty of Fresh Air

Good air quality is essential to the health of our stabled horses.

Photo courtesy of Hilary Moore.

With so much emphasis on keeping our horses warm, it is often our first instinct to lock windows and cover vents. Good air quality is essential to the health of our stabled horses. Avoid exacerbating existing respiratory conditions or even predisposing your horse to developing respiratory problems by improving ventilation in the barn. Passive ventilation involving floor and soffit level vents provides a draft-free flow of fresh air.? Mechanical ventilation systems also provide fresh air without causing drafts. However, simply opening stable doors and windows or keeping fans above ground and running will improve ventilation. It is much healthier for stabled horses to have access to cool fresh air than stagnant air within a sealed building. You can also reduce the amount of inhaled particles by moving horses outside while mucking, cleaning or throwing hay, and using water or dust suppressants in riding arenas.

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