Activity

hilda gurney piaffe

Develop Piaffe with Hilda Gurney, Part 2

A guide for training this collected movement under saddle

Credit: Courtesy, Janet “Dolly” Hannon This horse is displaying articulation of the joints in his hindquarters and legs. This is an example of positive diagonal advanced placement (DAP).

Dressage Terminology Explained: “Quick Behind”

USEF 'S' dressage judge Janet "Dolly" Hannon explains what it means for a horse to be "quick behind" and why this quality is important in developing dressage horses.

Angard is an 11-year-old Hanoverian stallion owned by Elisabeth Ehrenrooth.

Building Power In Relaxation with Hubertus Schmidt

A top German dressage professional explains how to make your horse active and cadenced without losing relaxation.

dressage horse in front of the leg

Dressage Terminology Explained: "In Front of the Leg"

Heidi Chote explains what it means for a horse to be "in front of the leg."

create energy in your dressage horse

Create Energy in Your Dressage Horse

Tom Noone explains how to address this common problem in dressage training by improving your horse's response to your aids.

If you try to add activity to a misaligned horse, the energy you create in the hind legs disappears out the crooked body part instead of passing through the back and connecting to the bit.

Activate Your Dressage Horse’s Motor

Learn what correct activity is and how the rider can use her aids to activate her horse’s motor.

Credit: Arnd Bronkhorst - arnd.nl The whip is a useful tool when used appropriately, but we must be conscientious not to allow it to make us lazy with our other aids.

In Which Hand Should I Carry the Dressage Whip?

Jennifer Roth answers this reader question, explaining some factors that might affect how you carry your whip.

Credit: Arnd Bronkhorst- arnd.nl

Kyra Kyrklund's Smaller Steps for Greater Balance

Dressage Olympian Kyra Kyrklund shares a simple solution to common balance problems with horses at any level.

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Go Back to Basics to Build a Solid Training Foundation

Instead of a quick fix or short cut, go back to basics to build a solid foundation of training.